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Video Processing Perspectives

Elemental Blog

Elemental Blog

Submitted by Heidi on May 26, 2016

The broadcast industry has traditionally been powered by advertising. As broadcast content is increasingly consumed via IP-connected devices, new approaches to monetization are taking hold to optimize online revenue opportunities. In the last three years in Europe alone, online video revenue has increased a tremendous 1700 percent, topping more than $422M.

In this webcast, Lionel Bringuier, Director of Product Management at Elemental, and Ashique Anwar, Senior Product Manager, Live & VOD Platform at Ooyala discuss the differences between client-side ad insertion (CSAI) and server-side ad insertion (SSAI), in light of the effort by content providers to personalize ads while maintaining a high quality viewing experience.

There are several challenges in deploying CSAI including device proliferation, which creates the need for a universal platform that supports all devices with respect to ad insertion. This is an expensive proposition, especially when upgrading becomes important. There is also the need to create a unified viewing experience across devices, and to create a seamless user experience between content and advertisements – free from buffering and degraded quality resulting from differing aspect ratios.

SSAI, though not yet the de facto solution, may provide increased opportunities for content providers in meeting these challenges as long as it is able to track user views and enable personalized ad content. During the webcast, Bringuier and Anwar demonstrate an Elemental-Ooyala solution for SSAI, which is available in both on-premises and in cloud deployments for ease of use and resiliency.

Submitted by Heidi on May 24, 2016

Video customers in South Korea have come to expect the highest quality viewing experience, and for good reason. The country was the first in the world to broadcast UHD when pay TV channel U-max began broadcasting 4K documentaries, live concerts and cartoons in April 2014. Since then, South Korea has consistently topped charts as being the most 4K-ready nation in the world. According to Akamai’s  State of the Internet Report (2015 Q4), which is updated quarterly, South Korea remains firmly in the global lead for internet connection speed, averaging 26.7 Mbps, a 30 percent increase over Q3’15. This is considerably faster than second place Sweden (averaging 19.1 Mbps) and well above the world average of 5.6Mbps.

This speed, coupled with virtually 100 percent penetration in the pay TV market shared by two market leaders, KT and SK Broadband, is key to promoting UHD video delivery. The UHD TV market in APAC more than doubled in the last year, according to research firm GFK, and South Korea is the largest UHD TV market in region and the second fastest in terms of growth.

The largely young, urban South Korean population is accustomed to sophisticated multiscreen services, and is already benefitting from the innovation offered by market leaders KT, one of the leading in-country telecommunications companies, and SK Broadband, which is investing heavily in content creation. As they both move to keep pace with the South Korean market demand, the companies are expanding their use of Elemental high-efficiency video coding (HEVC) software to make 4K UHD a key part of their offerings. With software-defined video solutions from Elemental, both KT and SK have the processing capacity and bandwidth to deliver a great UHD viewing experience, and a highly efficient, scalable video infrastructure as the South Korean market expands. 

Submitted by Alicia on May 9, 2016

Authored by Katie Ash, Communications & Events Coordinator, Lift Urban Portland

When the team at Lift Urban Portland learned that Elemental Technologies would be supporting our organization with a $30,000 grant through the Elemental Community Investment Fund, we were thrilled and surprised – but not completely shocked.

Over the past two years, Elemental has cultivated a deep partnership with Lift Urban Portland by being one of the largest donors to our 2015 food drive, providing financial and volunteer support for our garden program and acting as a liaison for Lift Urban Portland to the broader Portland technology community. That kind of partnership is key for Lift Urban Portland. We’re a small organization with big dreams, and we rely on our community partners to help us achieve our mission.

Lift Urban Portland aims to eliminate hunger in Northwest and downtown Portland by providing food for those in need. We serve a population that remains invisible to most visitors, and even residents of this neighborhood. While Northwest Portland is often associated with affluence, two of the four most economically depressed ZIP codes in Oregon are in fact located in Northwest and downtown Portland, based on a 2015 analysis by the Economic Innovation Group.

We lift up this population through our food pantry, which is visited by more than a hundred people each week; our food box delivery program, which provides a five-day supply of groceries delivered directly to the doorsteps of those who physically cannot make it to the pantry; and our Food for Kids program, which provides nourishment for low-income families.

But our work doesn’t stop there. We also use food as a vehicle to provide nutritional education and build community through programs like Supper Club, which brings together residents in low-income apartment buildings to cook and share a meal together. Our goal isn’t just to nourish the body, but the mind and spirit as well.

Elemental’s pledge to Lift Urban Portland of $30,000 over the next three years provides valuable ongoing support we can count on to sustain and expand our programs to best serve our neighbors in need. The funds are slated to bolster our community-building programs like Supper Club and the food box delivery program – two offerings that are unique to Lift Urban Portland and aren’t provided by any other organizations in this area.

We are so grateful to Elemental for truly giving back to the community in a meaningful way.

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